BPA is Back: Why and How to Avoid it


mason bottle bpa baby bottle

BPA: the worrisome chemical that many food companies have promised to stop using, but haven’t.

 

A recent study performed by the Breast Cancer Fund found that 67% of cans or lids still contain BPA. Since then, a slough of companies like Campbell’s Soup Co. and Del Monte Foods and have announced plans to, yet again, phase out of BPA.

But, why all the fuss? BPA, which stands for bisphenol A, exhibits hormone-like properties, specifically estrogen. It’s used to make plastics and epoxy resins, which appear in common household items, like food containers and water bottles. Once a container made using BPA is heated, the chemical can easily leak into foods and beverages, which make their way into our bodies.

Although issues such as disruptions in nervous system and reproductive system development have only been observed in animals, studies have shown that prenatal exposure to BPA can lead to behavioral problems and childhood asthma. This is why the FDA issued a ban on BPA in children’s products like baby bottles and sippy cups back in 2012.

But fear not, there are plenty of ways to skip the BPA.

  • Use different plastics. If you absolutely use plastic, opt for #2, #4, and #5, which you can reuse safely, according to Baby Green Thumb.

  • Avoid the cans. When scouring the grocery store aisles, look for non-canned items, like spaghetti sauce in a glass jar instead of a can.
  • Say “no thanks” to those receipts. Studies performed by the Environmental Working Group found BPA in two-fifths of the tested receipts. Touchings these receipts may leave traces of BPA on skin, and once thrown away, these receipts can leach BPA into other materials.
  • Use non-plastic containers to store foods and drinks. Branch Basics tells us that the best material is glass, because of its inert nature and nonporous surface. With Mason Bottle, you don’t need to worry about BPA: simply heat the milk (but not too much!) or whatever drink in the glass mason jar by detaching the nipple and the lid, and you’re good to go!

 


Leave a comment



Featured Products





Shop Our Instagram




@faustisland just bought a pack of Mason Bottle Silicone Nipples, and then combined one with a classic blue mason jar she had at home. Extra adorable!

@valeryphalon.photography uses Mason Bottle Silicone Sleeves to make toddler training cups for her big girls.

@headygrimm gets a Mason Bottle + Silicone Sleeve ready for her little one. She got the whole bottle including the jar as part of the Essential Mason Bottle Gift Set, but you can also make your own with jars from home using the Mason Bottle DIY Kit.

@loveandcovenant uses the 8 oz DIY Kit in combination with their mason jars from home.

@eyecreate_ gave her little lade The Original Mason Bottle. The width of mason jars makes them easy to hold for little hands.

@headygrimm got the Essential Mason Bottle Gift Set for her little one. It comes with both size bottles, both sleeves, and set of extra set of Medium Flow Nipples.

Paola used Mason Bottle with her son Max from the day they brought him home from the NICU. Though he didn't take to the preemie nipples in the hospital, he latched onto his Mason Bottle immediately!

@sriesland stocked up on mason jars for pumping at work, then she got a Mason Bottle DIY Kit to turn those jars into baby bottles.

@MasonBottle we like to use our 4 oz. sleeves with baby food portions.





Why Moms Love Us




Logo

Made in the USA

"I wish I knew about these before I had my shower, and avoiding all the plastic bottles I ended up with. They will also make great glasses after bottle use is over. Also happy to see the Made in the USA mark on the product as well." -Cathryn

Logo

Easy to Clean

"The next best thing to breastfeeding and the world's best shower gift! I love that I will never again have to buy a baby bottle because I already have tons of mason jars and they are so easy to clean. Our little guy loves his bottle!" -Susan

Logo

Breast Like Shape

"The nipples are very wide, like on an actual breast, and our daughter really liked them. Early on, she would suck really hard on the other nipples and make a very strange noise. As soon as we changed over to these her feeding became effortless." -Denielle




Our Most Popular Feeding Tips







Featured On

featured featured featured